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Medical Deans Welcomes Government Commitment on Medical Workforce Needs in Regional and Rural Australia

By | Monday, December 19th, 2016
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Media Release
14 December, 2016

Medical Deans Australia and New Zealand today welcomed the Australian Government’s commitment to addressing the maldistribution of medical professionals across regional and rural Australia, announced by Assistant Minister Gillespie.

Professor Nicholas Glasgow, Medical Dean’s President said the lack of medical services is having an impact on the health of regional and rural Australians and agreed the priority for medical workforce training is specialist training opportunities in regional and rural Australia.

“Medical Dean’s have long advocated for a flipped model of joined up, regionally-based specialist training with a city rotation to provide greater opportunities for young doctors to undertake their specialist training in regional and rural locations and remain in these locations.”

The Government has also indicated they will undertake an assessment of the number and distribution of medical school places and medical schools in Australia and Medical Dean’s looks forward to contributing to this assessment.

In 2015 the number of domestic medical school graduates in Australia was 3055. The number of domestic students commencing medical school in 2016 was 3215. More than 28% of commencing domestic medical students have a rural background.

Professor Glasgow said

“The establishment of rural clinical schools has greatly expanded the number of medical students experiencing a rural clinical placement. Students who undertake a rural placement report high levels of satisfaction and the most recent data from a survey of final year medical students indicate 36.5% have a preference for practicing outside a capital city.

The rollout of the Regional Training Hubs in 2017 will further assist in retaining medical graduates in regional areas.

The real challenge in meeting the medical workforce needs of rural and regional Australia is to ensure the increase in medical graduates translates into doctors in the specialties and locations they are most needed and Medical Deans looks forward to working with the Government to achieve this.”

Further Information: Carmel Tebbutt, CEO Medical Deans, 0437 476 267, 02 8084 6557

Letter to SMH Editor on Bullying and Harassment

By | Monday, November 14th, 2016
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Wollongong Hosts Medical Deans Annual Conference 2016

By | Monday, October 24th, 2016
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Media Release
11 October 2016

The University of Wollongong is hosting medical educators from across Australia and New Zealand at the Medical Deans Annual Conference this week -more than 70 participants are coming together to discuss key issues in medical education and research.

Medical Deans is the peak professional body representing entry level medical education, training and research in Australia and New Zealand and each year a different university hosts the annual conference.

Conference delegates will hear addresses from Professor Paul Wellings, Vice Chancellor, University of Wollongong, Grattan Institute Director, Dr Stephen Duckett and science broadcaster, Robyn Williams. Key sessions include:

  •      + Research Challenges: Funding, Impact and Supporting Clinical Academic Pathways
  •      + Increasing the Number of Indigenous Doctors – Successes and Challenges
  •      + The Impact of Technology on Medical Education

The conference also includes an Indigenous Knowledge Initiative where Medical Deans will learn about the health needs of the Illawarra Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community and discuss how medical education can contribute to improved health outcomes for Indigenous people.

Professor Nicholas Glasgow, President, Medical Deans said:

“Medical schools across Australia and New Zealand share many common challenges whether it be supporting the next generation of clinical academics, addressing rural medical workforce shortages or finding better ways to engage with our students. Conference delegates will hear presentations from experts and share knowledge and experiences.”

Professor Alison Jones, Executive Dean, Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health, University of Wollongong said the University of Wollongong was thrilled to be hosting the Medical Deans Annual Conference this year.

“This is a great opportunity to showcase our area and the University of Wollongong’s commitment to excellence in research and teaching. Delegates will also tour the Innovation Campus to view first hand this exciting facility.”

The Medical Deans Annual Conference commences at 9am on Thursday 13 October at the Novotel Wollongong Northbeach Hotel.

 

 

Survey Reveals Unique Snapshot of Future Doctors

By | Tuesday, October 11th, 2016
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Media Release

9 October 2016

A comprehensive survey of more than 2000 newly minted medical graduates, provides a unique snapshot of the origins, dreams, expectations and frustrations of Australia’s future doctors.

The questionnaire, conducted by the Medical Deans Australia and New Zealand and to be released at the annual conference, was sent to all of Australia’s 19 medical schools prior to the graduation of their final year medical students in 2015. The survey asked questions about demographics, birthplace, career goals, rural versus metropolitan origin and intended residence.

The study found that

+ over 83% of medical graduates are interested in becoming involved in teaching

+ there has been an increase in those for whom the financial benefits of being a doctor has no impact on their preferred area of medicine as a career;

+ the number of graduates who have a partner has increased from nearly 41% in 2011 to 49% in 2015

+ In 2015 36.5% of medical graduates indicated their first preference region of future practice was outside a capital city compared to 32% in 2011. In 2015 over 18% nominated a major urban centre such as Wollongong, Geelong, Cairns or Gosford, 12% a regional city or large town and 6% a smaller town or community

The Medical Deans Australia and New Zealand have been collecting data on demographic, education and career intentions of medical students since 2008, gathering a dataset of more than 30,000 participants. This is the second year the Deans has conducted a single on line survey of final year students.

Professor Nicholas Glasgow, President of Medical Deans, commented that a standout trend from the survey is the “consistently high percentage of final year medical graduates interested in teaching (83%) and/or research (62%). Academics or clinicians undertaking teaching and research are crucial in developing the next generation of doctors. It is a positive sign that so many graduates envisage contributing both to the education of students and to evidence based healthcare research.

A key challenge for policy makers and Government is to convert the interest medical graduates have in teaching and research into a career choice.  This requires continued investment in research and the establishment of integrated clinical academic training pathways.”

According to the CEO of Medical Deans Australia and New Zealand, Carmel Tebbutt, “the data collected provides an important tool for the planning of future generations of doctors. Since 2008 the Annual Medical Students Workforce Survey has provided a range of information from demographics, satisfaction, rural versus metropolitan origin and destination and other information that are crucial for the development and planning for all Australia’s medical workforce,” she said.

“Importantly the Medical Student Outcome Database, provides medical schools with invaluable feedback on both what their graduates are like, and their future career intentions. The MSOD can help answer important questions such as how to improve the distribution of the medical workforce in rural and regional Australia.”

In detail the study reveals some interesting facts such as:

+ In 2015 36.5% of medical graduates indicated their first preference region of future practice was outside a capital city with 18.7% nominating a major urban centre such as Wollongong, Geelong, Cairns or Gosford, 11.8% a regional city or large town such as Alice Springs, Dubbo, Bunbury or Launceston, 4.2% a smaller town (10 000 – 24 999 population size) and 1.8% a small community

+ 31 % of medical students come from outside capital city, with 11.5% from major urban centres, 7.8% from a regional city or large town, 4.2% from a smaller town and 7.5% from a small community

+ The bulk of medical students, not surprisingly, come from Australia (64%) with the next biggest group coming from Canada (4.4%) followed by Malaysia at 4%. The US and India provide almost an equivalent number of students at 1.6% and 1.8% respectively

+ The top four intended areas of future practice have remained the same over the past five years: adult medicine/internal medicine/physician; general practice; surgery; and paediatrics and child health

+ The number of graduates registering an interest in research remains relatively consistent over the past years at around 60% plus with a five year trend pointing to an increase

+ More than 83% of survey participants who had completed a prior degree or certificate had done so in the fields of Science, Medical Science or Health/Allied Health while 9.4% had completed a postgraduate degree

+ The level of satisfaction for all medical school programs has remained constant since 2011 with around 75% either satisfied or very satisfied with their medical course

+ Since 2011 there has been an increase (from 18.7% to 24.2% in 2015) in proportion of graduates who say that financial prospects have no influence at all on their preferred area of medicine as a career, while the percentage of those for whom financial prospects are very important has remained relatively steady at around 25%

+ For the first time, more than half (53.6%) of graduates reported that the financial costs of medical school/education debts did not influence their preferred area of medicine as a career, an increase of 5% over the previous year (these 2 tables refer to the influence on their preferred area of future practice of medicine)

+ However more than one third of those surveyed said that the number of years required to complete training had a significant impact on their choice of preferred area of medicine while those that said this had no impact rose by almost 5% since 2011

The MSOD and Data Linkage Project is funded by the Commonwealth of Australia, Department of Health. The Medical Schools Outcomes Database National Data Report 2016 was prepared with the assistance of the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare.

 

International Recognition for Leaders in Indigenous Education Network

By | Wednesday, June 8th, 2016
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Media Release
8 June 2016

The Leaders in Indigenous Medical Education (LIME) Network has received a prestigious international award – the ASPIRE Award for Excellence in Social Accountability. The Aspire Award is developed under the auspices of the Association for Medical Education in Europe, the leading international association for medical education.

The ASPIRE Award recognises medical, dental and veterinary schools that excel in assessment of students, student engagement, social accountability of the school and faculty development. This is the first time the international award has been presented to a program representing a collective of schools.

The LIME Network supports collaboration between medical schools in Australia and New Zealand to advance the development, delivery and evaluation of quality Indigenous health initiatives.

The reviewers highlighted that the LIME Network Program and its members clearly demonstrate a strong commitment to social accountability, noting that it is ‘[a]n impressive bi-national initiative with a focus on a topic of national (and indeed) global priority, within a clear construct of social accountability. Key outcomes and impact have been, and continue to be achieved, through a model that is inclusive, participatory, and community oriented.’

The review panel also observed ‘the LIME Network operates to bind all medical schools together creating greater impact than could be achieved by any alone, or by any smaller grouping.’

Professor Shaun Ewen, LIME Network Project Lead, said that ‘the Network has contributed to transforming the future Australian health workforce. Indigenous leadership, better trained physicians, more diversity through the recruitment and graduation of more Indigenous medical students. Indigenous people taking their rightful place.’

Professor Nicholas Glasgow, President of Medical Deans congratulated the LIME Network: ‘This is a great achievement for LIME Network members, particularly the LIME Reference Group and secretariat. It is a tribute to the innovation evident in the field of Indigenous health and medical education made possible through their collaborative work.’

The LIME Network is a project of Medical Deans Australia and New Zealand, and receives funding from the Australian Government Department of Health. The Network is dedicated to ensuring the quality and effectiveness of teaching and learning of Indigenous health in medical education, as well as best practice in the recruitment and graduation of Indigenous medical students.

Contact:

Carmel Tebbutt, CEO Medical Deans, +61 2 8084 6557, +61 437 476 267 or admin@medicaldeans.org.au

Odette Mazel, Research Fellow and Program Manager, Leaders in Indigenous Medial Education (LIME) Network, +61 3 83449160 or omazel@unimelb.edu.au

Specialist Training Needed to Keep Young Doctors in the Bush

By | Friday, May 27th, 2016
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Media Release
27 May 2016

Medical Deans, the peak body for entry level medical education, again calls for the Federal Government to invest in viable, regional post graduate training programs to address rural medical workforce shortages.

Medical Deans President, Professor Nicholas Glasgow said he was pleased to see Minister Ley’s comments in the Bendigo Advertiser which showed the Government understood that simply increasing the number of medical school training places will not provide regional and rural Australia with the medical workforce they need.

Bendigo Advertiser 20  May 2016

Health Minister Sussan Ley said the government had been advised against creating any more medical training places. 

“We will go on talking about it, but at the moment my experts and the Australian Medical Association are telling me we don’t need any new medical training places in Australia,” she said.

She said the number of student undergraduate medical training places doubled between 2008 and 2016.

Professor Glasgow said “More post graduate training opportunities are needed so medical graduates can stay in rural areas for their specialist training. We have more than doubled the output of our medical schools over the last 15 years and there are now significant numbers of medical students and interns in rural and regional areas.

However the path to becoming a fully fledged doctor is a long one and many young doctors end up back in our cities in order to complete their specialist training”.

Professor Glasgow said that scarce resources needed to be allocated across the training pipeline where they could make the most difference. He noted that the proposed University of Newcastle Central Coast medical school involved a transfer of Commonwealth supported places from the University of Newcastle campus.

“The growth of rural clinical schools means medical students can experience high quality rural placements. They have been successful in increasing the number of medical students with a rural background – since 2003 the number of medical students from a rural background has increased from 20% of commencing students to nearly 26% in 2015. It is now time to address the next disconnect in the rural training system by enabling graduates interested in rural medical careers to stay in rural areas while they finish their training” .

Contact: Carmel Tebbutt, CEO Medical Deans, 02 8084 6557, 0437 476 267 or admin@medicaldeans.org.au

 

 

2016 Federal Budget Highlights

By | Monday, May 9th, 2016
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HEALTH

There are few new initiatives in the Health portfolio, beyond what was announced prior to the delivery of the Budget.

Expenditure – Investment in health, aged care and sport in 2016-17 is $89.5 billion, an increase of 4.1% on 2015-16. This includes a $71.4 billion investment in health, a 3.2% increase on 2015-16.

The major initiatives are:

  + The April COAG new funding arrangements for public hospitals which provides an additional $2.9billion over three years to commence in 2017-18

  + The Health Care Homes trial of coordinated primary care (announced 31 March 2016) will cost $21.5 million and is to be funded by redirecting fee for service payments for Chronic Disease Management Medicare items for participating patients. (The Government will redesign the Practices Incentive Program (PIP) to introduce a new quality incentive from May 2017, which will achieve savings of $21.2m)

  + The Child and Adult Public Dental Scheme – $1.7 billion over four years

  + General practice registrars training on the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine Independent Pathway to claim a higher level of Medicare benefits rebate for the services they provide while training ($8 million over four years but from within existing resources of the DoH)

  + The Rural and Regional Training Infrastructure Grants Program will be redesigned and renamed the Rural General Practice Grants Program to provide a broader range of infrastructure grants to teach and train rural health practitioners (existing funding of $20.7m from the DoH will be redirected for this purpose)

  + $63.8million to be provided for new or amended PBS listings including for treatments such as melanoma and breast cancer

There are a range of saving measures, with funds redirected to health policy priorities. They include:

  + The pause on indexation of the MBS fees will continue until June 2020 saving $925m over two years. There has been a strong response to this measure with concerns being raised about its impact on bulk billing and the AMA saying “the poorest, the sickest and the most vulnerable will be hardest hit”

  + Pausing indexation on the Health Flexible funds for a further two years from 2018-19 (savings of $182.2m over 3 years). Flexible funds will be combined into a new funding structure from 1 July 2016 with eleven outcomes streamlined to six

  + Enhancing the Medicare compliance program is to achieve efficiencies of $66.2m over four years from 2016-17

  + $5.1m will be saved over four years from the recommendations of the first stage of the MBS Review

Other:

  + GP training positions continue at 1500 per year

  + STP continues with 900 in 2016 and then reflects the MYEFO Rural Integrated Pipeline announcement for subsequent years.

  + Commonwealth Medical Internships program continues to provide 100 places a year.

  + The Medical Research Future Fund (MRFF) board will develop national medical research priorities to guide where future funds will be allocated.

  + Integrated Rural Training Pipeline Initiative is as announced in MYEFO in December 2015

HIGHER EDUCATION

 Funding for Higher Education is $12.3 billion for 2016 – 17, a 0.9% increase.

The Government has released a higher education reform discussion paper “Driving Innovation, Fairness, and Excellence in Australian Higher Education”. New reforms are not budgeted to commence until 2018 (there are still savings in the forward estimates). The Government plans to work with stakeholders to finalise the package in 2016 and legislate for commencement in 2018. The Government has said it will not be implementing deregulated course fees as proposed in the 2014-15 Budget. The discussion paper raises alternative models of flexibility for institutions to set fees for a small cohort of students enrolled in courses of clearly defined excellence or “flagship courses”.

A range of other measures are raised in the paper including reforms to the allocation of postgraduate places, enhancements to QILT surveys, options to adjust subsidy and student contributions and changes to the HELP repayment thresholds and rates.

The paper also flags seeking the views of the sector on the relativities between disciplines of funding clusters and to work with Universities Australia to investigate the relative cost of delivery of higher education.

An Expert Advisory Panel has been established and written submissions on the paper can be made up until 25 July 2016.

Other Measures

The Higher Education Participation Program has had $152m cut over four years and the Promotion of Excellence in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education has had $20.9m cut over four years

Three existing programs (Commonwealth Scholarship Program, Indigenous Support Program and Indigenous Tutorial Assistance Scheme) will be consolidated to create a new program to improve completion rates for Indigenous higher education students. This is to provide greater flexibility for universities to implement responses to meet the needs of individual students.

Boost Postgraduate Training and Doctors will Stay in the Regions

By | Wednesday, March 30th, 2016
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OPINION ARTICLE
The Australian
March 30, 2016
By Professor Nicholas Glasgow
President Medical Deans

A recent Productivity Commission report reinforced what many in country towns and rural regions already know — it’s tough finding a GP or specialist, and the lack of medical services is having an ­impact on the health of rural and regional Australians.

People who live in regional and rural Australia are more likely to die of cancer, will die earlier and have higher rates of cardiovascular disease, diabetes and suicide than their city cousins. In a developed country such as Australia this is simply unacceptable.

Will a new medical school lead to more rural doctors? There is ­renewed interest in a proposal to create a new medical school with Orange, Wagga Wagga and ­Bendigo campuses, called the Murray Darling Medical School Initiative — with the sole aim to train doctors in rural areas on the assumption they will stay there.

This misses the crucial issue behind our rural doctor shortage: it’s not more medical schools that are needed, it’s more rural and ­regional general practice and ­specialty training places.

Simply building a rural-based medical school that will train students in locations where there are already rural clinical schools is not the answer.

We are awash in medical schools already. Australia has more than doubled the output of its medical schools over the past 15 years, largely to address the shortage of doctors in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Per capita, we graduate more doctors than almost all OECD countries.

This, combined with a huge increase in the importation of doctors from overseas, means we have what could be considered a high water mark for our medical workforce. It’s just that most don’t work in the bush.

A lot has already been done to encourage medical graduates to work in regional and rural ­Australia. Many universities have rural clinical schools and students can experience placements in country areas. Federal government funding for these universities requires 25 per cent of medical students to be from a rural background, and these are the students more likely to want to practice in a rural area. Since 2003, the number of students from a rural background has increased from 20 per cent of commencing students to nearly 26 per cent.

There are more medical students and internships per capita in regional and rural Australia than in metropolitan Australia.

There is not a lack of willingness or interest among graduates to practise outside cities. Students from the city who undertake a rural placement also report high levels of satisfaction with the ­experience. However, the path to becoming a fully fledged doctor is a long one. Four to six years at medical school, followed by a year of internship and then typically four to 10 years spent training to be a specialist.

Competition for specialist training positions is fierce and even young doctors with the best intentions end up back in our cities to secure a training position.

This also tends to coincide with the time when young people are settling down with families, complicating the issue even further.

The small number of regional specialist training posts available are generally filled by trainees on short-term rotations from the city. It would be much more effective to create self-contained regional training programs, which would reserve these posts for trainees who want a career in rural ­medicine.

So what is needed is more general practice and other specialist training opportunities in the bush. As long as young doctors have to return to big metropolitan hospitals to complete their training, we will struggle to address the ­inequity in distribution of the medical workforce in Australia.

Understandably the idea of another new medical school that is rurally based appears an attractive option to governments and communities alike, who want to see the problem solved.

The federal government has already outlined a solution to the disconnect in the rural training system.

The regional training hubs and rural junior doctor innovation fund and new rural specialist training places will all provide opportunities for graduates interested in rural careers to stay in rural communities while they complete their postgraduate training.

There is much evidence to suggest doctors who train in remote and rural areas stay there.

These new initiatives recognise that our limited rural health resources and training capacity need to be directed to the training positions that follow medical school, not the medical schools themselves.

Rural communities will be much better served by an investment in regional post­graduate training.

Professor Nicholas Glasgow, President of Medical Deans Australia and New Zealand.

Medical Deans Celebrate Women’s Achievements

By | Tuesday, March 8th, 2016
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MEDIA RELEASE
8 March 2016

Medical Deans is celebrating International Women’s Day by highlighting women leaders in medical education and research.

Professor Nicholas Glasgow, President of Medical Deans, said that International Women’s Day was an opportunity to celebrate the enormous contribution women have made to medicine and medical education and research.

“There are now six Deans and five Deputy Deans at the 21 medical schools and faculties across Australia and New Zealand. This is a significant increase since 2004 when the first woman Dean of Medicine, Professor Judy Searle was appointed at Griffith University.

“Over the last three decades there has also been a significant increase in the number of women studying medicine. We have come a long way since the University of Melbourne graduated Australia’s first women doctors, Clara Stone and Margaret Whyte, in 1891. In 2014, 51 percent of Australian medical graduates were women and there were 1 666 women (51.9 percent) commencing medical studies in 2015.”

Professor Glasgow acknowledged there are still challenges to address. “While we have seen substantial progress, it remains a challenge to see the increase in medical school students translate into a similar increase of women in leadership positions and specialist roles and we will continue to work towards this end.”

The Executive Dean at the University of Wollongong, Professor Alison Jones, said profiling the achievements of women leaders can assist in reaching this goal.

“The importance of women leaders as role models and mentors cannot be underestimated. I hope being a female executive dean, medical practitioner and toxicologist will encourage girls to consider a science-based career and to aspire to a leadership position. We are nuts as a nation if we don’t use half of the smarts of the population.”

“Medical Deans is committed to diversity in medicine, supporting women and reducing barriers that may stand in the way of women continuing to rise to the top of the profession.”

Across university campuses, events such as Monash University’s Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences International Women’s Day lunch are being held to celebrate women’s achievements.

Contact: Carmel Tebbutt, CEO Medical Deans, 02 8084 6557, 0437 476 267 or admin@medicalddeans.org.au

 

Current Women Deans and Deputy Deans

Professor Christine Bennett AO is Dean of Medicine at the University of Notre Dame Australia in Sydney. Professor Bennett is a specialist paediatrician and has over 35 years of health industry experience in clinical care, strategic planning, and as a CEO in the public, private and not-for-profit sectors. She is also Chair of Research Australia, Sydney Children’s Hospitals Network and formerly the National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission.

Professor Shirley Bowen is Dean of Medicine at University of Notre Dame Australia, Fremantle. Professor Bowen holds Fellowships in Infectious Diseases and Sexual Health Medicine. Her research interests include strategic planning for the prevention of HIV and STIs; Chronic Disease Management Services; cost effectiveness and health outcomes; and Residential care and the Emergency Department interface.

Professor Wendy Erber is Dean of the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences at the University of Western Australia. Professor Erber, a Rhodes Scholar (the first female from NSW), worked as a haematologist in Sydney, Perth and Cambridge hospitals. Her specific areas of interest and expertise are cellular haematology, and particularly the integrated approach to the diagnosis and assessment of haematological malignancies. In 2015 she was named the Cancer Council WA’s Research of the Year and inducted as a Fellow by the Australian Academy of Health and Medical Sciences.

Professor Annemarie Hennessy AM is Dean of the School of Medicine, at Western Sydney University and Foundation Chair of Medicine (2006-2016). Professor Hennessy is a Renal and Obstetric Physician with a research interest in Hypertension and Hypertension in pregnancy.

Professor Alison Jones is Executive Dean of the Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health at the University of Wollongong. Professor Jones is a scientist and medical practitioner who has served as a high-level toxicology adviser to NSW Ministry of Health. Professor Jones maintains strong, collaborative research partnerships with health and medical researchers nationally and globally. Professor Jones is Secretary of Medical Deans Australia and New Zealand.

Professor Christina A. Mitchell is Academic Vice-President and Dean of the Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences at Monash University. Professor Mitchell has practiced as a general physician and as a specialist haematologist. Professor Mitchell major research is to investigate the role of lipid phosphatases in development and human disease.

Professor Cheryl Jones is Deputy Dean (Education), Sydney Medical School. Professor Jones is a clinician-scientist in paediatric infectious diseases who leads a bench-to-bedside research program covering laboratory-based research, population health epidemiology and surveillance of infectious diseases.

Professor Michelle Leech is Deputy Dean of the Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences at Monash University. Professor Leech has been a research fellow at Monash Centre for Inflammatory Diseases and continues as a consultant physician and deputy director of Rheumatology at Monash Health. Professor Leech is Treasurer of Medical Deans Australia and New Zealand.

Professor Imogen Mitchell is Deputy Dean of the Medical School, ANU College of Medicine, Biology & Environment. Professor Mitchell is an intensive care specialist and a senior medical advisor to the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care. Professor Mitchell’s major research is development of sustainable processes for managing patient deterioration.

Professor Tania Sorrell is Deputy Dean (Clinical), Sydney Medical School. Professor Sorrell is Director of the Marie Bashir Institute for Infectious Diseases and Biosecurity (MBI) and is an infectious diseases physician and medical mycologist whose research focuses on invasive fungal infections.

Professor Eileen Willis is Deputy Executive Dean of the Faculty of Medicine, Nursing & Health Sciences at Flinders University. Professor Willis has a research interest in the area of Indigenous public health policy and is currently engaged in two research projects examining the impact of rationalised care in the public hospital system and international nurses.

Medical Deans Support Strong Action to Close the Gap

By | Sunday, February 14th, 2016
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MEDIA RELEASE
11 February 2016

Medical Deans Australia and New Zealand adds its voice to calls for renewed efforts to improve outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.

Professor Nicholas Glasgow, President, Medical Deans said:

“While the release of the 2016 Close the Gap Report shows varied progress across the seven targets, it is clear there is still an unacceptable gap in health, education and employment outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians.”

“Medical Deans is pleased to see the progress in improving Year 12 attainment and closing the gap in child mortality and reiterates our commitment to work for further improvements particularly in closing the life expectancy gap. Our Collaboration Agreement with the
Australian Indigenous Doctors Association (AIDA) is the foundation for promoting medical education that contributes to achieving Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health equality.”

The fourth Collaboration Agreement between the AIDA and Medical Deans includes objectives to increase the Indigenous medical workforce and to ensure doctors in Australia possess the knowledge and skills to work competently with Indigenous people. This is essential to reducing the gap in health outcomes and doctors understanding the social, cultural and economic context of Indigenous peoples lived experiences.

The number of Indigenous doctors graduating from medical programs in Australia is increasing with 35 Indigenous graduates in 2014. In 2015 a further 65 Indigenous students enrolled in year one medicine, which is 2% of all commencing Australian medical students.

“These are encouraging figures but there is still much to be done to grow the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander medical workforce, including improving retention of students, providing greater support for prevocational Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander doctors and training more medical specialists” said Professor Glasgow.

2016 will see the Medical Deans Annual Conference include an Indigenous Knowledge Initiative. In addition, the Leaders in Indigenous Medical Education (LIME) Network, a programme funded by the Australian Government Department of Health, supports medical
schools to deliver quality Indigenous health curriculum and best practice in the support of Indigenous students.

For more information contact: Ms Carmel Tebbutt, CEO Medical Deans, 02 8084 6557 or 0437 476 267

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